Info

One day, one page, one sketch of GREAT EXPECTATIONS, published daily at 8:40 AM.

Miss Havisham’s Press

231TAKING YOUR TIME. —PREIMPULSE.comWhen artist Julio Panisello placed his copy of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations in my hands, it was visceral. This is what happens when you set a goal and break it down into smaller pieces that you work on every day. As I turned the painted pages of the book, I derived more meaning from viewing the work as a whole than when I looked at the individual sketches he was posting each day on his website. Continue reading.

 

 

190TIME STOPPED. WHAT MISS HAVISHAM TAUGHT US ABOUT LETTING GO. —PSYCHICEVERYDAY.com
Miss Havisham is a character in Charles Dickens’ ‘Great Expectations’, famous for being jilted by her groom-to-be on their wedding day. Havisham receives a telegram at 8:40am on the day in question, letting her know that her betrothed will not marry her.
What does Havisham do after this rude rejection? She decides to stop time in that precise moment, 8:40am. Continue reading.

 

276Who’s Down with OPP (Other People’s Projects)? —SCHINDERMANIA!First is artist Julio Panisello’s project, Havisham Hour. Having seen so many different film versions of Great Expectations, Julio is painting a piece a day, a page a day, of the original Dickens material. Looking at not only the themes in the book, but also the ideas of adaptation, small art vs. large, and time and space constraint, posting each morning at 8.40am (when Miss Havisham received her jilting and stopped the clocks). Continue reading.

 

 

 

147THE VAL GARLAND

 

 

 

 

 


231The Art of Reading: The Havisham Hour. —DIESELBOOKSTORE.comEach of us reads for different reasons. I daresay even when our reasons are said to be the same – e.g., “distraction,” “education,” “entertainment,” etc. – we’re usually describing something unspeakably and maybe unintentionally personal.  There is an art to reading, and it creates as much as (perhaps more than) it consumes. In this series of posts, we highlight people who take this notion to heart. Continue reading.

Advertisements